#fuckthepolice this is on some bullshit.  (Taken with instagram)

#fuckthepolice this is on some bullshit. (Taken with instagram)

Under Promise, Over Deliver…

Whoever came up with the phrase “under promise, over deliver” was the person who inevitably allowed MEDIOCRITY to be acceptable. To under promise, in hopes of over delivering, you set yourself up for FAKE success. You let people know that you are too SCARED to step out of the comfort zone, and step into something that could be potentially amazing. 

"STEP OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE, NOTHING WORTH WHILE WAS EVER CREATED THERE!" - Yours Truly, Aaron Wang

There are so many people that are praised for mediocrity and sub par performance. There are people that thrive off of being “average.” What the hell is average anyways? It is nowhere I ever want to be, that’s for sure. By shooting for perfectly average, you are shooting to be just like every other FAILURE. 

How many MILLIONAIRES AND BILLIONAIRES do you believe told themselves “I know we can move 1000 units, so I’m going to say we can move 700, so when we move 1000, I look like a fucking hero!”? I’m going to go ahead and say zero. 

The wealthiest person I’ve ever known is a perfect example of how to achieve true SUCCESS. He became partners in a company back in the 90s that was essentially an “authorized dealer” for telecomm services (i.e. Comcast, DirectTV, etc). They had 13 employees total. He walked into a sales meeting, stood on top of a chair, and SHOUTED “YOU ARE ON THE GROUND FLOOR OF WHAT WILL BECOME THE LARGEST DIRECT MARKETING AND SALES COMPANIES IN THE WORLD. WE WILL EXPAND INTO NATIONWIDE MARKETS. WE WILL DOUBLE, TRIPLE, QUADRUPLE IN SIZE BEFORE YOU CAN EVEN STOP TO CATCH YOUR BREATH. WE WILL GO PUBLIC. AND I GUARANTEE, THAT EACH OF YOU SITTING IN THIS ROOM RIGHT NOW, IF YOU DEDICATE YOUR TIME TO THIS COMPANY AND THE COMPANIES SUCCESS, YOU WILL BE A MULTI MILLIONAIRE IN THE NEXT 5 YEARS!” Half of the people sitting in the room laughed. They got fired on the spot. Today, that company is the largest direct marketing and sales company in the world. They have multiple markets in every state across America, they are in 13 countries, and they are in the process of going public. The man I am talking about was making $220,000 A WEEK in 2008. Did he under promise and over deliver, or did he over promise with no intent of under delivering?

Success is not achieved through accepting mediocrity. Success is not achieved with fear. STEP OUT OF YOUR FUCKING COMFORT ZONE, AND DO SOMETHING THAT WILL LEAVE A MARK IN THIS WORLD. Everyone has the ability to live with their name among the stars, to live above the clouds. The only problem with that, is most people choose to live their “normal” life that they are “comfortable” with. 

True comfort is knowing you don’t have to worry about bills. True comfort is having your kids college tuition sitting in an account before your kids are even born. And, trust me, true comfort is a Tempur-pedic bed, over stuffed micro fiber couches, down comforters, and suede seats in a Bentley. Lol. 

I hope that at least one person will read this that needs to read this. I hope that this can help at least one person take a step toward success. 

"I’m not saying I’m gonna change the world, but, I guarantee will spark the brain that will change the world." - Tupac Shakur

Peace

P. S. When is the last time you heard a beautiful woman say “I hope I find a perfectly average man” or “Gosh, I hope this guy is mediocre.” Don’t be an idiot. 

#truth #thetown #seattle #supersonics #sonicsgate #nba #mycitysfilthy #206 (Taken with instagram)

#truth #thetown #seattle #supersonics #sonicsgate #nba #mycitysfilthy #206 (Taken with instagram)

#malasadas  (Taken with Instagram at Agnes Portuguese Bakeshop)

#malasadas (Taken with Instagram at Agnes Portuguese Bakeshop)

Guava juice, Portuguese sausage & eggs, Mac nut pancakes w/ coconut syrup. I tried to take the whole thing down and failed miserably. #aloha  (Taken with instagram)

Guava juice, Portuguese sausage & eggs, Mac nut pancakes w/ coconut syrup. I tried to take the whole thing down and failed miserably. #aloha (Taken with instagram)

Fresh #pineapple after the hike. Hot as balls right now  (Taken with Instagram at Diamond Head Crater)

Fresh #pineapple after the hike. Hot as balls right now (Taken with Instagram at Diamond Head Crater)

My balcony view #aloha (Taken with instagram)

My balcony view #aloha (Taken with instagram)


I was shooting a scene in my new film, No Strings Attached, in which I say to Natalie Portman, 

“If you miss me. you can’t text, you can’t email, you can’t post it on my Facebook wall. If you really miss me, you come and see me.” 

I began to think of all of the billions of intimate exchanges sent daily via fingers and screens, bouncing between satellites and servers. With all this texting, emailing, and social networking, I started wondering, are we all becoming so in touch with one another that we are in danger of losing touch? 
It used to be that boy met girl and they exchanged phone numbers. Anticipation built. They imagined the entire relationship before a call ever happened. The phone rang. Hearts pounded. “Hello?” Followed by a conversation that lasted two hours but felt like two minutes and would be examined with friends for two weeks. If all went well, a date was arranged. That was then. 
Now we exchange numbers but text instead of calling because it mitigates the risks of early failure and eliminates those deafening moments of silence. Now anticipation builds. Bdoop. “It was NICE meeting u” Both sides overanalyze every word. We talk to a friend, an impromptu Cyrano: “He wrote nice in all caps. What does that mean? What do I write back?” Then we write a response and delete it 10 times before sending a message that will appear 2 care, but not 2 much. If all goes well, a date will be arranged. 
Whether you like it or not, the digital age has produced a new format for modern romance, and natural selection may be favoring the quick-thumbed quip peddler over the confident, ice-breaking alpha male. Or maybe we are hiding behind the cloak of digital text and spell-check to present superior versions of ourselves while using these less intimate forms of communication to accelerate the courting process. So what’s it really good for? 
There is some argument about who actually invented text messaging, but I think it’s safe to say it was a man. Multiple studies have shown that the average man uses about half as many words per day as women, thus text messaging. It eliminates hellos and goodbyes and cuts right to the chase. Now, if that’s not male behavior, I don’t know what is. It’s also great for passing notes. there is something fun about sharing secrets with your date while in the company of others. think of texting as a modern whisper in your lover’s car. 
Sending sweet nothings on Twitter or Facebook is also fun. in some ways, it’s no different than sending flowers to the office: You are declaring your love for everyone to see. Who doesn’t like to be publicly adored. Just remember that what you post is out there and there’s some stuff you can’t un-see. But the reality is that we communicate with every part of our being, and there are times when we must use it all. When someone needs us, he or she needs all of us. There’s no text that can replace a loving touch when someone we love is hurting. 
We haven’t lost romance in the digital age, but we may be neglecting it. In doing so, antiquated art forms are taking on new importance. The power of a hand-written letter is greater than ever. It’s personal and deliberate means more than an email or text ever will. It has a unique scent. It requires deciphering. But, most important, it’s flawed There are errors in handwriting, punctuation, grammar, and spelling that show our vulnerability. And vulnerability is the essence of romance. It’s the art of being uncalculated, the willingness to look foolish, the courage to say, 

“This is me, and I’m interested in you enough to show you my flaws with the hope that you may embrace me for all that I am but, more importantly, all that I am not.”

- Ashton Kutcher

I was shooting a scene in my new film, No Strings Attached, in which I say to Natalie Portman,

“If you miss me. you can’t text, you can’t email, you can’t post it on my Facebook wall. If you really miss me, you come and see me.”

I began to think of all of the billions of intimate exchanges sent daily via fingers and screens, bouncing between satellites and servers. With all this texting, emailing, and social networking, I started wondering, are we all becoming so in touch with one another that we are in danger of losing touch?

It used to be that boy met girl and they exchanged phone numbers. Anticipation built. They imagined the entire relationship before a call ever happened. The phone rang. Hearts pounded. “Hello?” Followed by a conversation that lasted two hours but felt like two minutes and would be examined with friends for two weeks. If all went well, a date was arranged. That was then.

Now we exchange numbers but text instead of calling because it mitigates the risks of early failure and eliminates those deafening moments of silence. Now anticipation builds. Bdoop. “It was NICE meeting u” Both sides overanalyze every word. We talk to a friend, an impromptu Cyrano: “He wrote nice in all caps. What does that mean? What do I write back?” Then we write a response and delete it 10 times before sending a message that will appear 2 care, but not 2 much. If all goes well, a date will be arranged.

Whether you like it or not, the digital age has produced a new format for modern romance, and natural selection may be favoring the quick-thumbed quip peddler over the confident, ice-breaking alpha male. Or maybe we are hiding behind the cloak of digital text and spell-check to present superior versions of ourselves while using these less intimate forms of communication to accelerate the courting process. So what’s it really good for?

There is some argument about who actually invented text messaging, but I think it’s safe to say it was a man. Multiple studies have shown that the average man uses about half as many words per day as women, thus text messaging. It eliminates hellos and goodbyes and cuts right to the chase. Now, if that’s not male behavior, I don’t know what is. It’s also great for passing notes. there is something fun about sharing secrets with your date while in the company of others. think of texting as a modern whisper in your lover’s car.

Sending sweet nothings on Twitter or Facebook is also fun. in some ways, it’s no different than sending flowers to the office: You are declaring your love for everyone to see. Who doesn’t like to be publicly adored. Just remember that what you post is out there and there’s some stuff you can’t un-see. But the reality is that we communicate with every part of our being, and there are times when we must use it all. When someone needs us, he or she needs all of us. There’s no text that can replace a loving touch when someone we love is hurting.

We haven’t lost romance in the digital age, but we may be neglecting it. In doing so, antiquated art forms are taking on new importance. The power of a hand-written letter is greater than ever. It’s personal and deliberate means more than an email or text ever will. It has a unique scent. It requires deciphering. But, most important, it’s flawed There are errors in handwriting, punctuation, grammar, and spelling that show our vulnerability. And vulnerability is the essence of romance. It’s the art of being uncalculated, the willingness to look foolish, the courage to say,

“This is me, and I’m interested in you enough to show you my flaws with the hope that you may embrace me for all that I am but, more importantly, all that I am not.

- Ashton Kutcher

(via yourstrulyprincessvilet)

#gotem #jordan #iv and I didn’t have to wake up at 3am to get’em.  (Taken with instagram)

#gotem #jordan #iv and I didn’t have to wake up at 3am to get’em. (Taken with instagram)

#foodporn #hellasushi  (Taken with Instagram at Japonessa)

#foodporn #hellasushi (Taken with Instagram at Japonessa)